Axis of Right

Three Native Rhode Islanders Commenting From the Right on Politics and Anything Else

Archive for January 4th, 2006

Kocham Polske

Posted by Mike on January 4, 2006

The Polish government is rounding up its elected officials with links to its former Communist leaders and stripping them of their ambassadorships. I enthusiastically applaud this move! Now before you libs start shrieking “McCarthyism,” I suggest you follow this link to refresh your memory of what those Communists were all about.

As someone who has visited Poland (thanks to Ola Dulkiewicz and Jakub Kozera), I speak with great fondness of our Polish friends. The people of Poland have witnessed first hand the horrors of Nazi and Communist tyranny. Undeterred, they faced down their oppressors with a fierce determination that make good people everywhere proud. During the struggle, they provided the world with a great man we will never forget. Today, it is clear Poland hasn’t forgotten. Kocham Polske!

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Stuck on Stupid

Posted by Sal on January 4, 2006

It has now been learned that 55 million years ago, global warming caused Ocean currents to shift. However, some scientists think that this bolsters worries about current Global Warming.

Of course, those horrible automobiles and air conditioners from 55 million years ago were responsible for the global warming then. Talk about stuck on stupid.

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Club for Growth Supports Steve Laffey. Look Out Linc

Posted by Mike on January 4, 2006

“He’s committed to limited government, lower taxes, including a supply side approach.” These are the words of Club for Growth President Pat Toomey supporting Steve Laffey in this year’s Rhode Island Senate race. For those who might not remember, the Club for Growth is a common sense thinktank known for their brilliant telvesion ads. Just ask Howard Dean.

The National Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee (NRSCC) is spending its money attacking Mayor Laffey despite the fact that Senator Chafee’s political philosophy is closer to Ted Kennedy’s than their own. Given the past effectiveness of Republican party communication, I’m glad Mayor Laffey will have the Club for Growth on his side.

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More wonderful news from the People’s Republic

Posted by Sal on January 4, 2006

As if the anti-Catholicism of the MA state legislature wasn’t enough, now a movement is underfoot to prevent the people from voting. The organization Gay and Lesbian Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) filed a lawsuit yesterday to stop a ballot initiative that was initiated by the people and has the highest signature count of any popularly-initiated ballot initiative in history. They are focusing on a provision in the MA state constitution that says a popular initiative can’t be initiated to overrule a judicial decision. This would not be a problem except for the fact that the Judiciary has overstepped its bounds in a big way.

The people of MA, like the people in RI, need to stand up and be heard. They need to fight this, and if this measure is overturned, elect legislators who will propose an amendment to overturn the court’s unconstitutional abuse of power.

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The last acceptable prejudice

Posted by Sal on January 4, 2006

It has been said that the last acceptable prejudice in the United States is anti-Catholicism. The MA state legislature is supporting this view in a recent flurry of legislation, all aimed at the Catholic Church under the guise of protection against the sex abuse scandals of the past several years. Components of this legislation include:

  • Elimination of the $20,000.00 liability cap on civil cases against non-profit organizations in cases involving sexual abuse of minors
  • Relaxing restrictions of the statute of limitations on sexual crimes in both civil and criminal cases
  • Require religions organizations to provide full disclosure of financial information to the state Attorney General.

The sexual abuse scandal was a travesty. But under the current law, two priests were put in jail, the Diocese had to pay a large sum of money, and an Archbishop was forced to resign. None of the three above proposed laws would have done anything to prevent the sexual abuse scandal, nor would it have served no purpose except to further punish the Boston church at large instead of just the offenders.

The MA State Legislature is using the current (righteous) sentiment against those involved in the sex abuse scandal to attack religious freedom and the Catholic Church in particular. It makes me very nervous when a government (State or Federal) attempts to put oversight on religious organizations.

MA State Constitution

Article XVIII. Section 1. No law shall be passed prohibiting the free exercise of religion.

U.S. Constitution

Amendment I: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;

Article XVIII. Section 1. No law shall be passed prohibiting the free exercise of religion.

Posted in Politics, Religion | 2 Comments »

The problem of the Federal Reserve

Posted by Sal on January 4, 2006

The Fed announced yesterday that it would slow the rise of interest rates. This is good news. However, something needs to be done about the Federal Reserve system. There is too much power concentrated in the hands of fairly unaccountable officials. Many economists predicted that the rise in rates to 6.25% in 2000 would cause a recession — and it probably contributed. Now, we are slowing but probably stopping at 5% interest rates, which is above the 3.5% average. Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) makes an interesting case for abolishing the Fed on the principle that most recessions of the last 30 years can be traced to Fed policy. I’m not sure I’d go that far, but it is a problem when the Federal Reserve holds the biggest influence on the state of the economy.

Short of making structural changes to the Fed (which probably should be examined), Congress should pursue an aggressive fiscal policy to ensure long-term economic vitality and short-term countering of any fed policies. Such measures could include:

  • Abolishing the Corporate Income Tax: Taxes on corporations are meaningless. Some may say that corporations should pay their fair share, but what ends up happening is that corporations just add the cost of the tax to the price of the goods or services it provides. There can then be several layers of taxation added to the cost of a good, one for the manufacturer, one for the distributor, and one for the retailer, which all end up being paid by the consumer anyways. (See this article)
  • Simplification of the Tax Code: I’m talking about large-scale simplification, not the so-called simplification proposed by the special commission. Go to a strict flat tax (17%) where everyone pays 17% of their income above some poverty line (say 20k single/40k married) regardless of their income level. This will remove the problems with the AMT, not punish success, and make filing and paying taxes simple. (See this page).

These two items will go a long way to strengthen our economy and allow us to compete in a much more competitive world economy for generations. Other reforms include the abolishion of the Captial Gains tax and taxes on dividends. Of course, to do all this, we also need to cut spending, but that’s an article for another day.

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