Axis of Right

Three Native Rhode Islanders Commenting From the Right on Politics and Anything Else

Posts Tagged ‘Florida’

Dems Meet to Discuss Michigan and Florida Today

Posted by Ryan on May 31, 2008

One simple question:  if this is how the Dems run their party, what’ll it be like when they run the country?

Of course, we know the answer to that question, so let’s try to prevent that shall we?  The party that picked on Bush and the Republicans for eight years about mysterious “missing votes” in Florida and humming the mantra “let every vote count” every election cycle this decade, is now going to decide their nominee in smoke-filled rooms based by majestically anointed “superdelegates” while allowing Florida and Michigan to go either voteless or minimized during their nomination process and by simply ignoring their popular vote tallies.  Those tallies would put She Who Must Not be Named over Obama. 

I think this chaos is poetic.  If the Dems are too mean to SWMNBN and her door to 2012 is closed, I’d love to see her run as a third-party candidate.  They are treating her very poorly lately: doesn’t she have the right to run until all the states have voted, especially this late in the game?  Shouldn’t she be afforded the respect of a candidate who has won 4 of the last 6 primaries after she was told that she should drop out?  I suggest a third-party run since her party has been so disrespectful — they’ve earned the headache.

Regardless, some decision on Michigan and Florida should be due out today.

UPDATE: Michigan and Florida are getting half their votes counted… based on what though?  50/50?  Based on popular vote?  Are they going to now include the popular vote totals to the national ones?  SWMNBN could take this decision to the Credentials Committee, which could ostensibly keep this going to the Convention.  The new magic number for the Dems is 2118.  Boy this is fun to watch!

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Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Rudy Giuliani’s Good Strategy

Posted by Mike on January 30, 2008

Rudy Giuliani made the right decision when he decided to skip Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina to focus on Florida. The fact that his strategy was unsuccessful does not change the fact that the alternative would have been even more difficult to pull off.

At this moment, the Republican Party is not a conservative party; however, it is still a pro-life party. Any pro-choice candidate faces an uphill climb in a Republican primary. This is especially true in Iowa and South Carolina and generally true in New Hampshire. Rudy had no chance of winning any of these states. If he had campaigned heavily in these states, he certainly would have lost and resulting negative media attention and lost momentum would have killed his candidacy before it even reached the Sunshine State.

That’s not to say he had much of a chance in Florida either, but focusing his attention there was at least a plausible strategy. Unlike Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina, Florida is home to a large number of New York transplants who hold the Mayor in high regard. These voters, coupled with what Rudy hoped would be a split vote among a large field (similar to the large field in the earlier states) gave Rudy his only chance, small as it may have been, to win. It did not work, but that does not mean it was the wrong strategy.

If a mediocre football team with no passing game focuses on the run and still manages to lose to the New England Patriots, chances are, the strategy was not the reason for losing. OK, that’s a bad hypothetical because the Patriots cheat, but the point still stands. A pro-choice Republican lost in a pro-life party. It wasn’t the strategy that killed his chances. Pun intended.

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

It’s Not Over

Posted by Sal on January 24, 2008

The media would have you believed that the Republican nomination is all-but over, and John McCain is the nominee.  What this is is more of a case of the media hoping that their protege Republican will get the nod based on his perceived strength against the Democrats and his inevitability, much in the same way that they hailed Bob Dole as the most electable Republican in 1996.  With victories in New Hampshire and South Carolina, two states that have open primaries, McCain is now perceived to be the front-runner, if not inevitable.  The truth is, he has won fewer states than Mitt Romney, has fewer delegates, and has less of a vote total.  So how is he the front-runner again? 

Now enter Florida.  Florida has the distinction of being the final primary before super-duper Tuesday.  It also happens to be a closed primary, and McCain has not done well among non-Conservatives, capturing most of his support in the Republican Primary from Democrats and Independents.  Florida also has a fairly large 57 delegates at stake in a winner-take-all Primary battle.  Two new polls now look like the momentum in Florida has shifted to Romney. 

Both Rasmussen and Mason-Dixon have Romney up by 4 points in Florida.  Both of these polls were taken after the drop-out of Fred Thompson from the race, so it appears that Romney is benefiting from end of Thompson’s campaign.  (Only these two polls, as well as InsiderAdvantage, which has McCain up by 1 point, have been taken since Tuesday when Thompson left the race).  Mason-Dixon is by far the most accurate polling firm at the state level, followed by Rasmussen.  Although much could happen between now and Tuesday (including tonight’s debate), the momentum is clearly in Mitt’s favor. 

If Mitt does indeed claim victory in Florida, will he then be hailed by the Drive-by media as the “clear front-runner” going into Super Tuesday?  I doubt it, but it will be clear that the race for the Republican nominee is far from over. 

Posted in Election 2008, Media Bias, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »