Axis of Right

Three Native Rhode Islanders Commenting From the Right on Politics and Anything Else

Posts Tagged ‘George W. Bush’

McCain’s Address

Posted by Ryan on September 5, 2008

Last night I watched John McCain give his acceptance speech to the Republican National Convention; watching along with more people than saw The One, himself, a week earlier, discounting PBS (McCain was on fewer networks, however).  With Pain solidifying the Right, and positioning himself in the “non-ideological center,” McCain set himself up well for garnering wide electoral appeal in the Poppin’ Fresh General Election.

I thought the speech was OK.  It was John McCain being John McCain; he was true to himself.  I was with him 80% of the time and wanted to throw something at the TV 20% of the time.  But, that’s exactly the John McCain we nominated — he’s not fully Conservative, nor a reliable Republican.  The speech dragged in the middle, but ended with a great, passionate crescendo that wooed many of my Democrat colleagues at work today — you know, the people who know nothing about politics but are told by the Union which lever to pull and loyally oblige. 

They were generally impressed.  In fact, one of them was an Obama supporter until she saw Palin’s speech and heard for the first time about McCain’s brutal Vietnam War experience last night after watching the Giants game coverage meld into the RNC speech (the timing of the game actually worked out well!).  I know she’s not alone.  The Kool-Aid Lefties at work were on the defensive today worse than I’ve seen since the testimony of David Petraeus last September indicating the success of the Surge.  It must be serious out there!

One more note: some anti-war fascists disrupted McCain’s speech a few times over a ten-minute period.  Republicans, learning from their 2004 experience with these folks, chanted “U.S.A.” to drown them out. Finally McCain had a great appropriate line: “Americans want us to stop yelling at each other…”, which drew laughs and applause.  In fact if you add up the amount of time disrupted from the 2004 Bush speech and 2008 McCain speech, that’s more speech suppression from these anti-war rubes than any free speech the Patriot Act ever squelched!  At the end of the day these anti-war crazies hurt themselves more than help, but they just might be crazy enough to hurt someone one day, so I don’t condone their self-destructive Black Shirt behavior.

AP photo.

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Posted in Blogroll, Election 2008, Media Bias, Politics, The Iraq Front | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

He Can See Clearly Now: Bush Takes A Second Look at Putin

Posted by Mike on August 13, 2008

Most criticism of George W. Bush is off base and will look downright silly in a few years; however, one criticism of Bush is completely warranted. When Bush looked into Vladimir Putin’s eyes and saw a man he could trust, he should have done a double take. Today was the double take.

When the Soviet Union Russia invaded Georgia a couple of days ago, President Bush was a little slow in reassuring our ally that the US would stand by its side. At the very moment our ally was invaded by its former slave master, the U.S’s reaction should have been repeated statements of support coupled with actions that would make Russia take notice. Thankfully, John McCain is on record stating that Russia should be kicked out of the G8 and that the U.S. should build a missile defense system in Eastern Europe. Since it is now clear that Iran is not the only threat in the region, that would be fine with me. So would fast tracking Georgia, Ukraine and other willing members of Russia’ near abroad into NATO.

A healthy friendship with Russia is in the United States’ best interest. The thing is, a healthy friendship with the United States is also in Russia’s best interest. The world has basically ignored Russia while it whittled away at its civil liberties, armed American enemies in the Middle East, and poisoned people on foreign soil. The world’s reaction to this crisis has been reassuring. It seems that partying like its 1968 was a step too far.

Reuters photo

Posted in Election 2008, Europe, International Relations, Politics, Russia, tyranny, War on Terror | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Is Bush Batman?

Posted by Ryan on July 28, 2008

Apparently, a number of op-ed articles have hit the Internet regarding Christopher Nolan’s new film, the box-office shattering The Dark Knight, and how Batman allegorically plays the role of George W. Bush (some say Batman is Dick Cheney or a generic conservative hero)! 

A friend tipped me off to this concept last night and I looked around the Internet finding that this notion has been proliferating, even to the WSJ Online!  It makes a lot of sense to see The Dark Knight as an allegory of the War on Terror and about Batman as the man who few people like as the one who has to make the hard choice to blur the lines in order to achieve victory — aka GWB to some. 

Leftist blogs are wicked upset that a movie with such a black-and-white treatment of morality like this one can make $300 million in just ten days while their beloved anti-war flicks quickly sputter and die quick deaths!  In The Dark Knight, terrorists (The Joker’s crew) are the remorseless fiends who fight for no discernible reason beyond the joy of it, and the good people have very tough choice to make on how to defeat them.  It mirrors reality.

Given the box office success of this film, perhaps the American people still yearn for a no nonsense ass-kicker rather than an international ass-kisser in their leaders.  This bodes well for McCain down the stretch, with less than 100 left until my birthday, which happens to be Election Day this year.  But will people make this connection and understand its implications?  Will the baggage of the last eight years show up on Election Day and turn American into an Obama Nation?  Who knows?   If the allegory holds however, then it’s the Republicans and Bush who must take the hit for having made hard, sometimes unpopular, choices which have nonetheless made all of us safer.

Pic from Rick Rockwell.

Posted in Anything Else, Culture, Election 2008, Politics, Pop Culture, War on Terror | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Bush Push on Oil Drilling

Posted by Ryan on July 14, 2008

President Bush announced today that he is rescinding his father’s Executive Order which banned off-shore oil drilling.  And it’s about time in my opinion!  What’s interesting about this development is that Congress imposed it’s own separate ban, meaning that if off-shore drilling were to take place, both branches would have to agree.  Now, it’s solely in the hands of Congress.

Come to think of it, President Bush is really gaining a number of important victories over the Dems ever since they took over Congress:  Bush stopped the Dems from cutting-and-running in Iraq, securing Bush’s policy through the end of his term — a huge meaningful victory on the Homefront; Bush got his FISA bill through a hostile Congress with nearly all of his proposals in tact — not an easy task for any lame-duck; and now Bush has successfully outflanked the Dems by taking the drilling issue and put it on the laps of Pelosi and Reid! 

Brilliant maneuvering from an “idiot” who still has the capacity to outflank his opponents on important issues during the last year of his tenure.  This will expose the Dems’ weak and complex rhetoric about how the oil companies “can already drill”, or the mantra “we can’t drill our way out of this” nonsense.  They can try to blame Bush policies, but they will confuse the public who understands that gas comes from oil and securing domestic oil is a security issue.  Bush has set things up for the Republicans to pound the message home.  Will they take it?

Posted in economy, Election 2008, Politics, The Iraq Front | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Tony Snow Dies at 53

Posted by Ryan on July 12, 2008

Former White House Press Secretary, radio talk-show host, moderator of “Fox News Sunday,” and former speechwriter for Bush 41, Tony Snow finally succumbed to the colon cancer he had been battling for a few years now when he died at about 2am Saturday morning at Georgetown University Hospital.  Although they had removed his colon a few years ago, the cancer nonetheless spread to his liver last year.  He leaves behind a wife, three children and many friends and admirers.

I’d been watching Tony Snow ever since my local cable finally carried Fox News back in 2000.  It was kind of awkward watching Chris Wallace take over for him as the moderator of “Fox News Sunday” a few years later.  Also, I remember Tony Snow filling for Rush once in a while when I was in college (Sean Hannity would also fill in from time to time, which happened to be my first exposure to both Hannity and Snow — thanks Rush for recognizing talent!).  As Press Secretary, it was so refreshing to see Snow strike back at the MSM who was unsuccessfully trying desperately to embarrass him and the White House like they did so effectively to Scott McClellan.

Like Tim Russert, this death is a huge loss to the media and culture as both were taken from us with so much potential left to be realized.

AP photo.

Posted in Anything Else, Blogroll, Culture, Media Bias, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Jesse Jackson’s Very Loud Whisper

Posted by Ryan on July 10, 2008

Here’s a clip of an off-the-air comment uttered by Jesse Jackson the other day about Barack Obama’s faith-based initiative:

Jackson, of course, apologized for the remarks, but nonetheless he still said it in an unscripted moment when he thought the cameras were no longer recording.  Obama’s done the same thing when he talked about bitter small town America!  In the YouTube era, the cameras are always on and will be seen everywhere fast!  Obama quickly accepted the apology ostensibly so that the story would die as quickly as possible.

On the larger point though, Obama’s faith-based initiative would not let faith-based organizations screen clients or workers based on religious or ethical standards, which essentially makes the faith-based organization simply another arm of the government, without any regard for the faith itself.  I’d be upset too if I were Jackson, since the black community has been served very well through Bush’s faith-based programs as they are.  I don’t think I’d say I want to “cut his nuts off,” but I would be upset about Obama’s incessant condescension to blacks and his planned reversal of Bush’s successful policy.

Posted in Blogroll, Culture, Election 2008, Politics, Religion | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

New Poll: The Democrat Congress Sucks More Than Ever

Posted by Ryan on July 8, 2008

For the first time in the history of scientific polling, Congress, which happens to be controlled at present by Democrats, has reached a new all-time low of a 9% positive approval rating in the latest Rasmussen poll!  Splitting it up, that’s 2% excellent and 7% good, 36% fair, and 52% poor. 

Yet, for some reason on a generic ballot question, the Dems are still beating the Republicans by over 10 points!  So even though likely voters loathe Congress’ inaction in dealing with gas prices and the war, they still seem to like Republicans less in their generic sentiment. 

I wonder if some in the voting public believes that Bush and the Congress are both Republican-dominated?  If so, Congress would at least be at 32%, right?  Though this election is going to be tough, polls like this indicate an opening for Republicans this Fall.

Posted in Blogroll, Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

One Look at the Bush Legacy

Posted by Ryan on June 22, 2008

Finally a journalist who has some sense of historical perspective beyond the contemporary headlines!  Andrew Roberts wrote this article* comparing George W. Bush to another heavily maligned US president in his day, Harry S Truman.

I think the comparison may stand in historical perspective.  Harry Truman was deeply disliked by the American people in 1952, blamed for an unpopular war, and navigating through a tough economic transition after World War II.  Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, Truman was still viewed poorly: aside from the disastrous Korean stalemate, his “Fair Deal” fell flat, Congress kept flipping from Dem to Republican on him, Truman’s administration was constantly dogged for having real communist spies all over it, etc.  But no one remembers much of that through the lens of history, since the basic tenants of Truman’s Cold War policies were used by all subsequent administrations in a truly effective way until 1991.

Today, he’s viewed by members of both parties as a model President, even in the top five to some experts and certainly in the top 10 to others!  Even She Who Must Not Be Named once said that we need another Harry Truman — one who will make good decisions in the face of tough choices or being unpopular. 

In a sense, we do in George W. Bush.  As Roberts’ article explains, a President is usually remembered in history for one or two things.  In 2030, Bush will not be remembered for Valerie Plame or Katrina or the “recession.”  Once the contemporary politics has moved on, he’ll most likely be remembered for Iraq, Afghanistan, and for keeping America safe for the last 7 1/2 years of his Administration following 9/11.  Or at least Bush hopes so.

Pic from MIT.

* — Roberts, writing for a British paper, mixes up Warren Harding with Herbert Hoover initially.  As an historian this kind of bothers me, but his larger point still stands (plus he’s quoting from a left-wing news source, and you know loosely the Left uses history!)

Posted in Election 2008, Media Bias, Politics, Russia, The Iraq Front, War on Terror | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Historians: McCain’s Going to Lose

Posted by Ryan on June 15, 2008

According to this Politico story, historians (mostly liberal ones rooting for Obama I sure) give McCain a small chance of winning in the Fall.  (The rest of this post may seem like a little inside baseball if you’re not an historian.)

One historian compared this election to 1932, when FDR trounced Hoover.  Another compared it to the 1980 thumping of Jimmy Carter or Ike’s 1952 smackdown of Adlai Stevenson.  Some, more reasonable historians have related this to 1968, but on both ends: McCain as Humphrey, tied too closely to the party in power, as well as McCain as Nixon, taking advantage of a Democrat Party in total disarray.  Some cite historical cycles, which I can see hinders McCain in this case, and that those candidates tied to incumbent party’s popularity go against McCain in this cycle.

The article falls flat for me when it states that “the Democratic-controlled Congress is nearly as unpopular as the president.”  Um… not quite: the Democrat-controlled Congress is considerably LESS popular than Bush, by nearly half.  Remember, McCain is not an incumbent, and in the last non-incumbent race (1952) the war-hero trounced the intellectual and articulate liberal.  Plus, like Richard Nixon in 1968, everyone knows McCain, and unlike Jimmy Carter in 1976, the more we know about Obama, the more he seems like more of the same — he’s not a refreshing outsider like Carter seemed, rather Obama’s an unaccomplished political opportunist who occasionally doesn’t even know who his friends are.

I agree with the premise that McCain’s got a tough road, but so does Obama in my opinion:  we are at war, Obama is too inexperienced, has a cowardly voting record, and he’s not very bright when pushed on the issues. 

Posted in Election 2008, Media Bias, Politics, The Iraq Front, War on Terror | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

McClellan’s New Book

Posted by Ryan on May 28, 2008

Former Bush Press Secretary Scott McClellan has written a book that apparently says nothing new about the Bush Administration:  Plame?  Been there (Richard Armitage, folks).  The Rove-Libby-Cheney Triumvirate of Evil?  Done That.  The government response to Katrina had flaws?  Yawn.  Bush actually at one point tried to sell his Iraq policy to the people?  I’m shocked!  It’s early readers indicate many issues and points that may have been packaged to make a headline, or taken out of context. 

My take on their leaks are that the book is mostly a regurgitation of old news.  However, that’s not going to stop Bush’s enemies from bringing up the same old arguments to smack Dubya one last time on every old argument during this election cycle!  Democrat hack, Robert Wexler, wants to call McClellan in front of a House Judiciary Committee to attempt to connect corruption to Cheney — Wexler, who has been wanting to impeach Cheney for quite a while now.

I always thought Scott McClellan was a wimp that should have been replaced by Tony Snow much earlier.  Ari Fleischer was a great White House Press Secretary who could handle Helen Thomas and treated dumb questions with appropriate condescension.  In contrast, McClellan always seemed like a deer in the headlights during a critical time in our history and I was glad when he was replaced.  Ari Fleischer also is “scratching his head” over the book, since the Scott McClellan he knew would have voiced these concerns at least in private. 

Making a buck off his old boss seems to be McClellan’s m.o.  I agree with Karl Rove on this one: thus far, McClellan is starting to sound “like a left-wing blogger.”

AP photo.

Posted in Election 2008, Media Bias, Politics, The Iraq Front | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Is She Who Must Not Be Named Being “Dean Screamed”?

Posted by Ryan on May 24, 2008

I think the MSM might try to make this RFK statement made by She Who Must Not Be Named their 2008 Election attempt at another “Dean Scream.”

In defense of SWMNBN (shudder), she was just indicating that historically the primaries are still wide open in June and there is no precedent of getting out this early in tight primary races like the one the Dems have this year.  Did the MSM pick up that she also mentioned her husband’s campaign along with RFK’s reference?  RFK Jr. seems fine with what she said and what she meant so what’s the big deal?

In my opinion, it’s simple:  the MSM has calculated that by staying in the race SWMNBN hurts Obama in the long run, thus she must be promptly disposed of by saying or doing something embarrassing that can be taken enough out of context in order to accelerate her day of reckoning.  Hence, I think that MSM reports like this or this are an attempt to “Dean Scream” SWMNBN out of the race in order to save the Dems. 

Though behind, Dean was positioned very well in 2004 to be very competitive.  Then he got excited at a rally.  No one in the audience thought he went crazy that night… only a poll that showed Bush creaming Dean in the general should Dean get the nomination made it beyond over-spirited and into the realm of nuts.  Dean would hurt the Dems.  Dean had to go.  The MSM made sure that the anti-Dean, John Kerry, got the nomination (didn’t help them much though!).

This theory may seem a little black-helicopter but I think the MSM is behind Obama and needs this primary season to end.  Her RFK statements were not the brightest, but not that crazy either.  It just seems fishy to me.

Posted in Election 2008, Media Bias, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

White House Smacksdown NBC

Posted by Ryan on May 19, 2008

White House counsel Ed Gillespie had some tough words for NBC after they disingenuously edited an interview with President Bush which indicated that the President accepted a negative premise on the appeasement issue when the President did not. 

But what I love about the letter sent to NBC is Gillespie’s memory of two years ago when NBC was the first to declare Iraq’s sectarian strife a civil war.  Gillespie’s take: so does NBC still believe Iraq is in a civil war or has that civil war ended? 

Nice!  Way to call ’em on it!  I love how a basic memory and facts really miff the MSM sometimes. I wish Dubya and his crowd had been doing this for seven years rather than so intermittently. 

Posted in Election 2008, Media Bias, The Iraq Front | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

The Red v. Blue State Dynamic

Posted by Ryan on March 22, 2008

I found this article by Michael Barone, political guru whose wisdom is usually spot on, where for the first time I read a piece addressing a thought I’ve had for a while: is this whole Red v. Blue state-thing a Bush phenomenon? 

Barone makes an argument that no, it’s not totally a George W. Bush phenomenon, but rather a trend that started in the 1990s during BJ’s tenure.  Barone cites the last time two consecutive elections were so close as they were in both 2000 and 2004: 1952 and 1956 which happened to have the same candidates and only four states shifting their votes!

In Barone’s view, cultural issues like religion v. relativism, rural v. urban, intervention v. self-interest have kept the electorate pretty static since the late 1990s. Yet, he contends that in 2008, this dynamic is no longer there with Bush and what he represents as a figure with whom to rally around or reject.  The Dems will try to paint McCain as a third Bush term, but it’s too early to see if that ridiculous accusation will stick.

So if the Red v. Blue state dynamic is not present in this election, what does one candidate do to flip the state colors?  Barone also believes that this election may focus around generational differences and outreach to industrial states, which in his view may skew Democratic in 2008.  I’m not sure I buy that analysis totally.  Young people like Obama, but young people don’t vote in large enough numbers.  Plus, Obama’s been wounded lately and the polls of Millennials have not yet reflected this major bump in the road.

Posted in Culture, Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Obama Would Win Europe

Posted by Ryan on March 8, 2008

…And that’s one reason why I hope he’ll lose in America!

I was thumbing through my usual cites for something to post this morning when this piece posted on RCP emerged and struck a very dissonant chord with me. Guy Sorman’s “Europe Loves Obama” piece was hard to read since I wasn’t too sure if he was being tongue-in-cheek or not.  He’s definitely a Leftist Europhile and had a few outrageous things to say as to why Europe loves Obama:

  • Obama is a “good American” like Michael Moore, Robert Redford, Noam Chomsky, and Mia Farrow, not a “bad American” like Billy Graham, Dubya and Cheney.
  • Europe loves minorities while America oppresses our minorities, going as far as to say “whites started the war in Iraq.”
  • Europe infers that Obama is pro-Palestinian by the company he keeps and thereby might stick it to the Jews.
  • Obama’s a death-penalty abolitionist, he’s protectionist, and “reserved about his faith:” all things European elites love.
  • And finally Sorman states of European sentiment:  “The good American is expected neither to trade nor to fight terrorism. If more Americans were good, in fact, there would be no terrorists, as the Left in both Europe and the U.S. often contends.”

Huh?

Having re-read the article several times, I’m still not sure if Sorman was trying to make a point about European elitist absurdity or laying out these points as pluses for Obama!

Nonetheless, I’m surprised that an article like this is appearing so early in the campaign cycle.  Usually we get these kinds of stories closer to the general or even in the Fall as a last ditch effort for Europe to meddle in our affairs.  Remember the Daily Mirror‘s “How could 59 million people be so dumb?” post-2004 Election issue (strangely, after it was all said and done, John Kerry actually ended up with around 59 million votes to Bush’s 62 million)?  If Europe was so awesome and advice-worthy, why aren’t we talking about who the American people would like to be the next leader of the EU?  Exactly.  I have tended to vote against whoever European elites want running America, and apparently will proudly continue to do so in 2008 as well.

Posted in Anything Else, Blogroll, Election 2008, Europe, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

McCain Wins Republican Nomination

Posted by Ryan on March 5, 2008

Last night it became clear that Mike Huckabee was going to lose the nomination race outright and finally did what many have done before him and dropped out.  McCain reached above the 1191 delegates needed to secure the nomination and even officially received an endorsement from President Bush today (for good or bad I suppose).

Last night, I have to say that I genuinely liked McCain’s Dallas speech.  He spoke about his campaign strategy, which is to make this campaign be about ideas and contrasts, not personalities or gutter politics.  Since I believe that this is the strategy that he should use, I was happy to hear he thinks so too.  While he can’t walk on water or raise the dead like Obama can while giving a speech, I noticed that I wasn’t fearing the poor articulation of every sentence — which I had grown accustomed to since the summer of 1999 when Dubya began his campaign.  He’s not George W. Bush, but he’s also not Bob Dole either; he’s more feisty and isn’t afraid to call the libs out.

Listening to the speech, I also felt for the first time that McCain could pull this off and be our next President; he seemed to rise a bit taller last night if you get my figurative meaning.  

We know that She Who Must Not Be Named is not going away quietly even though it is unlikely that she can win the nomination cleanly through the will of the people.  SWMNBN and Obama are neck and neck with mo- on her side.  McCain even used the term “uncivil brawl” to describe today’s politics (shades of Rush, perhaps?). 

I’m not a McCainiac and I did voice my protest against him with my vote for Mitt Romney on February 5, yet McCain is now the party’s nominee and the task of pushing back the tide of socialism and liberalism is much more important than squabbling over a few differences.  If I get 80% of what I want compared to 0%, I’ll fight for that 80% every time.

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Debating the demise of the Republican Party

Posted by Sal on January 25, 2008

There has been much talk of the demise of the GOP in recent weeks.  Rush Limbaugh has been making the case that if Huckabee or McCain are nominated, it will destroy the GOP.  In an article today, Peggy Noonan states that the GOP is already in shambles, and it is because of George W. Bush. 

On every domestic issue other than taxes and social issues, Bush has been somewhat of a disaster.  In an effort to build a permanent Republican majority, he tilted left on issues such as education, spending, health care, immigration, and other such domestic issues.  He was firm on the war, (almost to a fault in not sooner realizing that his war strategy wasn’t working and needed adjustment) terrorism, taxes, and judges (minus the Harriet Meyers debacle), but not so anywhere else.  Were we conservatives too complainant during the early years of No Child Left Behind, the Prescription Drug bill, and massive increases in spending?  Did we gloss over those issues because of our concern for National Security and the economy? 

Bush’s strategy now seems to have backfired.  We have lost the congress, and are in danger of losing the presidency as well.  Even if we do win the Presidency, it will be with a weak quasi-Conservative or a media-pandering moderate.  The party does not have the same unity of purpose anymore, it is too fractured.  Is Bush to blame as Peggy suggests, or is it something else?  What must the party do to return to its Conservative roots in the model of the era of Reagan?  Who is out there who can lead the party back to Conservatism and into the next several decades?

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »