Axis of Right

Three Native Rhode Islanders Commenting From the Right on Politics and Anything Else

Posts Tagged ‘McCain’

The Financial Mess

Posted by Sal on September 16, 2008

With the collapse of Lehman Brothers to Bankruptcy, and with Merrill Lynch being absorbed by Bank of America, our financial system is foremost on many people’s minds this week.  Add to that the federal takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddy Mac last week, and the Bear Sternes collapse earlier this year, and we have a financial mess.  All of this primarily has to do with the collapse of the mortgage market, as Bear Sternes, Merryll Lynch, and Lehman Brothers all had significant holdings in mortgage-backed securities that have sharply dropped in value.  Both McCain and Obamaare calling for reform and increased government involvement and regulation into the financial sector.  This is precisely the wrong prescription. 

The problems we are seeing in the current mortgage crisis have very little to do with the free market, and more to do with government regulation.  In a free-market system, there is risk and reward.  It is natural that if a company is not run right, that company will fail, so there is every incentive to run the company correctly.  Since Frannie Mae and Freddy Mac were government-backed, in the sense that there was always an understanding that the mortgage under-writings were backed by the U.S. government.  In addition, the Federal Government, beginning with Bill Clinton and continuing with Bush, began mandating increased loans for low-income home buyers, creating the sub-prime industry that created billions of dollars in loans that people could not afford.  (This is also to say nothing of the corruption and back-scratching between Fannie and Freddy and various Democrats.)  It is because of this government intervention that we are in the crisis we are in.  The Freddy and Fannie takeover was necessary, but as Larry Kudlow reports, it is a good thing that the government did not bail out Lehman Brothers.  The concept of risk/reward has to remain in our free-market system, no matter what the short-term pain is. 

We are in a financial mess — one that will take some time to resolve.  It is not a crisis, depression, or recession.  It will resolve itself, as the fiscal crisis’ of the past always have.  The question is, are we going to make things worse with increased regulation, or are we going to reform, put sensible regulation where needed, but deregulate the mandates and allow the free market to work.

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Looking Bad for Obama

Posted by Sal on September 15, 2008

It is beginning to look bad for Barack Obama.  The last three days of Rasmussen polling have John McCain at 49-50% for the first time since Obama became the presumptive Democrat nominee.  The Rasmussen poll is a 3-day rolling tracking poll of Likely voters, and the polling occured after the Sarah Palin interviews with Charlie Gibson.  As most political scientists will tell you, when a candidate is at/over 50%, it spells trouble for the opposition.  Most other polls show the race either tied or with a McCain lead.  John McCain, in the last 2+ weeks, has turned this election upside down with the selection of Gov. Sarah Palin.  Whether this holds or not is still undetermined, but as of right now, team Obama has an uphill battle to climb. 

McCain is also polling well in most of the battleground states.  McCain is showing a consistant lead in Ohio, Florida, and Virginia, although trailing in Colorado and showing razor-thin leads in recent polling in New Mexico and Nevada.

Even more worrisome to Obama than the national polls and the battleground states, however, are a recent round of state polling that puts what are otherwise traditionally blue states in-play, such as Michican, Peensylvania, Minnesota, Wisconson, and Washington State.  There’s even some anecdotal chatter about the liberal bastion of New York State! If Obama loses even one of these states, it is likely that he will lose the election. 

Although the election results are far from certain, and anything can happen in the next 50+ days, the trend is towards McCain/Palin.  Team Obama will have to do some serious work to reverse that trend.

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Who’s Out of Touch?

Posted by Sal on September 13, 2008

The Obama campaign released an ad last night declaring McCain to be out-of-touch, attacking him for supposedly not knowing how to use a computer or how to send an email. 

The Obama campaign also looked like it was beginning this line of attack with its surrogates, as outlined in the AP.  In the last 24 hours, however, several facts have come to light on the blogosphere, beginning with Jonah Goldberg over at The Corner.  Jonah has found several articles, dating back to 2000, showing that McCain cannot use a keyboard due to his war injuries.  It is primarily this reason that he did not for a while learn to use his computer.  Forbes Magazine as well touched on his war injuries, and the things he could not do because of these injuries.  Since the time that the articles were written, however, HotAir has found a New York Times story from this past July outlining McCain’s familiarity with many sites and blogs on the Internet;  he may not be able to type or use the computer heavily himself because of his injuries, but he does go on many websites (including his daughter’s blog) with the assistance of Cindy. 

So Obama is either cruel and insensitive in regards to McCain’s war injuries, a liar for not reporting the facts correctly, or clueless for not being able to find this basic information.  If anyone is out of touch, it’s the Obama campaign for not knowing how to do a simple Google or Lexus Nexus search.

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

“Time For Some Campaigning”

Posted by Ryan on September 6, 2008

I was reading an email link a friend sent me as I sit through what’s left of Tropical Storm Hanna and got a good laugh.  Though it’s been around for a month, I just saw it and would like to share.  So, here’s a little “Jib Jab” fun for your Saturday afternoon.

WARNING: She Who Must Not Be Named cameo in the video.

Posted in Anything Else, Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Gay Marriage in California

Posted by Ryan on May 15, 2008

In a blatant example of judicial activism, the California Supreme Court today voted 4-3 to overturn the will of the people in order to impose gay marriage on the Golden State. 

If McCain nor Congressional Republicans won’t jazz up the conservative base, this should!  Marriage issues, cultural issues, judicial activism, court appointments, etc. are all at play here. 

AP photo.

Posted in Culture, Election 2008, Judicial Watch, Media Bias, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

Bush Speech Irks Obama, Dems

Posted by Ryan on May 15, 2008

President Bush was giving a speech to the Israeli Knesset commemorating the 60th birthday of Israel.  One of the most traumatic events in the history of the Jews and an integral part of the history of the state of Israel was the Holocaust, which only happened because of the horrors of World War II.  That war began as a result of years of appeasement towards Hitler and the Nazis.  “Never again” has been the mantra from the Israelis and Jews all over the world ever since.

So, Bush brought up this concept in his speech today, especially in lieu of the modern dangers of Iran, Hamas, Hezbollah, and al Qaeda on Israel:

“Some seem to believe we should negotiate with terrorists and radicals, as if some ingenious argument will persuade them they have been wrong all along. We have heard this foolish delusion before. As Nazi tanks crossed into Poland in 1939, an American senator declared: ‘Lord, if only I could have talked to Hitler, all of this might have been avoided.’ We have an obligation to call this what it is — the false comfort of appeasement, which has been repeatedly discredited by history.”

Somehow, Obama thought this was a swipe at Obama. 

The campaign and the national Dems subsequently flipped out in an amazing knee-jerk fashion: calling these remarks a “false political attack,” (Obama), “bullsh*t” (from the intellectual Joe Biden), an “embarrassment to our country” (Dean), “outrageous and offensive” (She Who Must Not Be Named), and that “serious” people would distance themselves from the remarks (Pelosi), and so forth.

Jumping on the Dems’ knee-jerk reaction, here’s how McCain responded:

“I think Barack Obama needs to sit down and explain why he wants to talk with a man who is the head of a government that is a state sponsor of terror, that is responsible for the killing of brave young Americans, who wants to wipe Israel off the map, denies the Holocaust. That is what I think that Senator Obama ought to explain to the American people….

“It is a serious error on the part of Senator Obama that shows naiveté and inexperience and lack of judgment to say that he wants to sit down across the table from an individual who leads a country who says that Israel is a stinking corpse, that is dedicated to the extinction of Israel. My question is what does he want to talk about?”

Here’s the catch, though, which makes McCain’s point.  This is quoted directly from Obama’s website under the section “Renewing American Diplomacy”:

Talk to our Foes and Friends: Obama is willing to meet with the leaders of all nations, friend and foe. He will do the careful preparation necessary, but will signal that America is ready to come to the table, and that he is willing to lead. And if America is willing to come to the table, the world will be more willing to rally behind American leadership to deal with challenges like terrorism, and Iran and North Korea’s nuclear programs.”

Um.  Right.  That’s modern appeasement and naivete articulated perfectly.  As if talking to radical jihadists will get them to suddenly stop hating Jews, they’d take off the suicide belt, and they’d stop planning to annihilate Israel in the name of Allah.  Wow!  That was easy!

Now I get it — the Dems are scared to death that people are going to pay attention to an actual policy position Obama has, couching it in “President Bush is bad and McCain should condemn him,” even though the real story here is not Bush (as the Dems would like), it’s Obama’s knee-jerk reaction which seems to have hit a nerve! 

Hat tip Drudge.

Posted in Blogroll, Election 2008, Politics, War on Terror | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Don’t Stop the NCGOP Ad!

Posted by Ryan on April 25, 2008

I know I’m going to disagree with John McCain more times than my conscience will like, but he needs to back off this one. The North Carolina Republican Party is trying to paint a Barack Obama out of touch with mainstream North Carolinians by citing Obama’s close relationship to the crazy Reverend Wright.

Here’s the ad which is causing all sorts of stress for the GOP right now:

John McCain calls the NCGOP as “out of touch” for airing such an ad.  It’s not out of touch, it’s a decent ad which highlights real voter concerns in a local election.  For McCain to come out before the MSM to condemn this ad, he’s adding unnecessary friction within the GOP at a time when we need to sit back and enjoy the other side’s breakdown.  Obama’s people are already painting this as McCain’s inability to control his own peeps.  Unfortunately, I’m sure this will not be the last time parts of the GOP clash with McCain this year in such a fashion. 

Posted in Election 2008, Media Bias, Politics, Religion | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

An Education: Democrats on the Economy

Posted by Ryan on March 27, 2008

We’ve finally learned something (on the record for a change) about Democrat’s vision for the today’s ailing economy!  Here’s a sample of Obama’s take on what he to do in tough economic times:

“To renew our economy — and to ensure that we are not doomed to repeat a cycle of bubble and bust again and again — we need to address not only the immediate crisis in the housing market; we also need to create a 21st century regulatory framework, and pursue a bold opportunity agenda for the American people….  We do American business — and the American people — no favors when we turn a blind eye to excessive leverage and dangerous risks….  If we can extend a hand to banks on Wall Street, we can extend a hand to Americans who are struggling.”

OK, let me get this straight:  Regulation.  Government handouts.  Ending the Business Cycle.

Been there, done that.

  • One of the things we learned from the 1970s (before Obama met Reverend Wright and while She Who Must Not Be Named was still wearing those dorky glasses) is that the more regulation the government imposes the less economic activity takes place from those targeted companies/industries, which will destroy job growth and diversification. 
  • Plus, government hand-outs to the “struggling” might be good mid-20th Century populist/class-warfare politics, but we’ve seen the abject failure of wealth redistribution in our own country: “War on Poverty” anyone?  
  • Back in the 1990s people were also talking about the end of the business cycle.  I don’t want an end to the business cycle because, quite simply, that means the end of capitalism.  Bad companies must be made to account, bad behaviors by consumers must be stymied by market realities, and bad investments must be punished if an economy is to learn and grow in the fastest and most natural way. 

So, what did I learn about the Democrat candidates and the economy today? 

Same old populist-socialist dribble that won’t fix anything but would continue the cycle of dependency.  But that’s what I expected them to say.  The bigger question to ask is:

Will John McCain take advantage of these scary policy positions that his opponents are putting forward on the record? 

One hopes.

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Uncivil War Begins to Mount Casualties

Posted by Ryan on March 26, 2008

This report from the Gallup organization has to have McCain feeling pretty good today, and also shows how the Uncivil War is doing potentially lasting damage to the Democrats.  According to the article, 19% of Obama supporters would desert and vote for McCain if She Who Must Not be Named were nominated, while 28% of SWMNBN supporters would likewise vote for McCain instead of the Empty Suit.

While it’s still too early to put a lot of importance behind these kinds of polls in regards to the Fall Campaign, it does indicate a lack of tolerance building between the Lying-Shrill One and the Empty Suit amongst different factions in the Democrat Party.  I don’t think that 28% of any Democrat’s supporters are going to flock to McCain in the Fall, but staying home or throwing one’s vote away on Nader would still do the trick in some important states.

AP photo (I wonder if he’s thinking “Read between the lines” or something).

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

McCain Wins Republican Nomination

Posted by Ryan on March 5, 2008

Last night it became clear that Mike Huckabee was going to lose the nomination race outright and finally did what many have done before him and dropped out.  McCain reached above the 1191 delegates needed to secure the nomination and even officially received an endorsement from President Bush today (for good or bad I suppose).

Last night, I have to say that I genuinely liked McCain’s Dallas speech.  He spoke about his campaign strategy, which is to make this campaign be about ideas and contrasts, not personalities or gutter politics.  Since I believe that this is the strategy that he should use, I was happy to hear he thinks so too.  While he can’t walk on water or raise the dead like Obama can while giving a speech, I noticed that I wasn’t fearing the poor articulation of every sentence — which I had grown accustomed to since the summer of 1999 when Dubya began his campaign.  He’s not George W. Bush, but he’s also not Bob Dole either; he’s more feisty and isn’t afraid to call the libs out.

Listening to the speech, I also felt for the first time that McCain could pull this off and be our next President; he seemed to rise a bit taller last night if you get my figurative meaning.  

We know that She Who Must Not Be Named is not going away quietly even though it is unlikely that she can win the nomination cleanly through the will of the people.  SWMNBN and Obama are neck and neck with mo- on her side.  McCain even used the term “uncivil brawl” to describe today’s politics (shades of Rush, perhaps?). 

I’m not a McCainiac and I did voice my protest against him with my vote for Mitt Romney on February 5, yet McCain is now the party’s nominee and the task of pushing back the tide of socialism and liberalism is much more important than squabbling over a few differences.  If I get 80% of what I want compared to 0%, I’ll fight for that 80% every time.

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Super Tuesday Post-Mortem

Posted by Sal on February 6, 2008

Well, Super Tuesday has come and gone, and the results are not good.  The race for the Republican Nomination is essentially over, and John McCain is the inevitable nominee.  First, lets look at last night’s indicators as mentioned in my previous post

 California:  This was the biggest disappointment.  All polls showed momentum in Mitt’s favor, and if he had pulled this off, he would still be in this race.  As it is, he received 10% less of the vote than McCain, and it was distributed widely throughout the state, so McCain won almost all of the CA delegates. 

The South:  Huckabee surged last night, winning 5 southern states.  While it kept delgates from McCain, it also prevented Romney from a conservative foothold in the South.  If Romney had won California, it would have been helpful;  that, however, did not happen, and now Huckabee has the distinction of being the regional candidate from the south. 

Massachusetts:  Romney won by 10, but it was not enough to solidify more than a bare majority of the Massachusetts delegates.  Romney won 22, McCain 17. 

New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Arizona:  McCain won all four of these must-win states for him, plus some unexpected surprises in Missouri, California, Oklahoma, and Delaware. 

Delegate Count:  The dust is still settling, but it looks like McCain could finish last night with around 700 delegates, while Romney would have shy of 300 and Huckabee around 175.  Overall, a huge win for McCain. 

With Romney essentially out (barring some improbably turn of events), the Conservative movement now must come to terms with John McCain as its nominee.  Over the past few days, I’ve gone through bouts of “McCain Derangement Syndrome” and wrestled with the idea of a candidate who had given Conservatives the finger so many times being our nominee for President.  I have to say, I do not like John McCain, I think he is a moderate who tries too hard to please the media and the left, someone who is more interested in sponsoring legislation with Ted Kennedy than with John Kyl.  But the prospect of a She-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named or Obama presidency is even worse than a McCain presidency, and so I will support McCain for President. 

I do feel, however that he cannot win.  Too many conservatives have an inherent distrust and disgust for John McCain, and there may be enough who decide to sit it out rather than have a RINO as President, or even some who would be foolish enough to cast a vote for the Democrat to send a message.  I do worry about McCain further diluting the conservatism of the Republican party, and dread the thought of another 8 years before we get a crack at the Presidency again.  However, with the war on terror, and the prospect of multiple Supreme Court vacancies, it is the best option we have.  This is not an endorsement of McCain, rather it is a resigned acceptance of the inevitable and the lesser of two evils choice. 

McCain now has work to do.  To win, he needs the base that he has disdained for the past 8 years.  He needs to unify and galvanize the base, and the best thing he can do is choose a good, conservative running mate, and make overtures to the base, to Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, Laura Ingraham, and Sean Hannity.  He needs to go to CPAC in with a conciliatory, unifying tone,  and show conservatives convincingly how he will help advance our goals and agenda.  It’s a tough road and may not be possible, but it is a must for him to win the Presidency. 

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Super Tuesday!

Posted by Sal on February 5, 2008

As those of us in twenty-four states go to the polls today, there are many things to watch.  I’m only going to touch on the GOP side, as I have not been following the particulars of the Democrat race (save the constant crying before a major election of She Who Must Not Be Named). 

California:  This is a closed primary state, which is Winner-take-all by District.  Polls are all over the map on this one.  The state is winner-take-all by district, so if Romney does well in the majority of districts, he could significantly expand his deleagte count here.  If he does not do well here, he is finished. 

The South:  This has been Huckabee’s stronghold, but he is now showing a sharp decline.  Recent polls have McCain/Romney up or near tied in many states.  Watch to see if either McCain or Romney make significant inroads in the south now that Huckabee is in decline. 

Massachusetts:  Yes, my home-state of MA is important today.  It is a state Romney is expected to win, but it partitions its delegates proportionally.  The margin of victory by Romney will be important as far as delegate count, so the higher the margin of victory, the better. 

Midwest/West:  There are several states that are holding caucus’ today.  Romney needs to win most or all of them to remain competitive. 

New York/New Jersey/Connecticut/Arizona:  All these are Winner-take-all, and heavily favored for McCain.  If he loses even one, it would be a major upset and probably finish him. 

Delegate Count:  At the end of the day, look for McCain to have around 600 delegates, Romney to have around 400, and Huckabee to have around 150 delegates.  If McCain has significantly more and Romney significantly less than the above, the race is basically over.  If the margin is closer by days end, look for Romney to have momentum.  Either way, today is an extremely critical day in the GOP primary race. 

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Romny-Mentum?

Posted by Sal on February 3, 2008

A week ago I was dejected that McCain was going to be the nominee of the Republican Party.  While I do have concerns over Romney, McCain has had the habit over the past 8 years of giving the finger to conservatives.  While Romney may be a gamble, I’d prefer a gamble to someone who has consistently gone out of his way to distance himself from conservatives. 

I still think that McCain is the probable nominee of our party.  But in what may be a glimmer of hope, Rasmussen has released a poll on California which has Romney and McCain tied;  this is after a similar poll several days ago showing McCain with a 4-point lead.  A similar poll by Zogby/CNN/USA-Today poll, which traditionally over-estimates McCain’s support, shows Romney with a 3-point lead in CA.  California probably represents Romney’s last stand.  If he can win there and Massachusetts, pick up some caucus states, he could remain competitive beyond Super Tuesday and possible get enough momentum to upset McCain.  If he loses CA, however, he is most likely finished.  California is a closed primary with a rather conservative Republican electorate, so he does have a shot.

I for one will be casting my vote for Romney on Tuesday, but for now, enough politics and time for the Super Bowl. 

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

It’s Not Over

Posted by Sal on January 24, 2008

The media would have you believed that the Republican nomination is all-but over, and John McCain is the nominee.  What this is is more of a case of the media hoping that their protege Republican will get the nod based on his perceived strength against the Democrats and his inevitability, much in the same way that they hailed Bob Dole as the most electable Republican in 1996.  With victories in New Hampshire and South Carolina, two states that have open primaries, McCain is now perceived to be the front-runner, if not inevitable.  The truth is, he has won fewer states than Mitt Romney, has fewer delegates, and has less of a vote total.  So how is he the front-runner again? 

Now enter Florida.  Florida has the distinction of being the final primary before super-duper Tuesday.  It also happens to be a closed primary, and McCain has not done well among non-Conservatives, capturing most of his support in the Republican Primary from Democrats and Independents.  Florida also has a fairly large 57 delegates at stake in a winner-take-all Primary battle.  Two new polls now look like the momentum in Florida has shifted to Romney. 

Both Rasmussen and Mason-Dixon have Romney up by 4 points in Florida.  Both of these polls were taken after the drop-out of Fred Thompson from the race, so it appears that Romney is benefiting from end of Thompson’s campaign.  (Only these two polls, as well as InsiderAdvantage, which has McCain up by 1 point, have been taken since Tuesday when Thompson left the race).  Mason-Dixon is by far the most accurate polling firm at the state level, followed by Rasmussen.  Although much could happen between now and Tuesday (including tonight’s debate), the momentum is clearly in Mitt’s favor. 

If Mitt does indeed claim victory in Florida, will he then be hailed by the Drive-by media as the “clear front-runner” going into Super Tuesday?  I doubt it, but it will be clear that the race for the Republican nominee is far from over. 

Posted in Election 2008, Media Bias, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »