Axis of Right

Three Native Rhode Islanders Commenting From the Right on Politics and Anything Else

Posts Tagged ‘Super Tuesday’

Richardson Joins the Obama-Nation

Posted by Ryan on March 21, 2008

New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson has endorsed Obama today.  Among other things, Richardson said of Obama:

“I believe he is the kind of once-in-a-lifetime leader that can bring our nation together and restore America’s moral leadership in the world….  As a presidential candidate, I know full well Sen. Obama’s unique moral ability to inspire the American people to confront our urgent challenges at home and abroad in a spirit of bipartisanship and reconciliation.”

I don’t know what planet Richardson’s on, but Obama has no significant record of bipartisanship, his radical preacher has raised serious questions about his true beliefs while observably hurting his mainstream appeal, making him look like a typical politician, and has made strong, uncompromising statements about his leftist policy positions including bombing our ally Pakistan and meeting with our sworn enemies in Cuba and Venezuela. 

Also, Bill Richardson dropped out on January 10.  It is now March 21.  That’s quite a long time to figure out who you are going to put your support behind, especially since we’ve had two Super Tuesdays since then to think about it.  I wonder if this is just because She Who Must Not Be Named would be forced to take Obama as her Veep, but Obama does not need her in the end.  This whole endorsement could be Richardson campaigning to be Obama’s Veep by allowing the news to focus on something positive in regards to Obama for a change.

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Posted in Culture, Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

No One To Blame But Ourselves

Posted by Mike on February 7, 2008

Although I don’t condone McCain Derangement Syndrome, there is no doubt that conservatives are rightfully in a funk. Who wouldn’t be after the party they know and love nominates someone who has repeatedly thumbed his nose at it? Before conservatives start lashing out at McCain however, it might be a good idea to take a deep breath and look in the mirror. We conservatives did this to ourselves.

This year our party had one conservative option and only one conservative option. When presented with that option however, many conservatives sacrificed principle for a certain je ne sais quoi. Some call it performance, I’ll call it style. What it can’t be called is principle. Despite having just about every conservative principle embodied in one candidate, conservatives scattered to non-conservative alternatives. Some went to the pro-amnesty Maverick. Others went to the tax-hiking pro-lifer. Others still went to the candidate who routinely switched his positions based solely on whatever his ambition happened to be at the time (three flip-flops on the abortion issue alone).

So why are we here? It’s simple if we look in the mirror. Fredhead-turned-Mitten Mary Matalin said it best:

“You reap what you sow. We like to applaud ourselves as the party of ideas and principle, but we turn out to be the party of performance art. All we did was gripe about Fred’s performance skills as opposed to his principles and policies — and . . . here we are,” Matalin said. “We let the perfect — as defined by performance — be the enemy of the great.” Fred Thompson would have been “a great candidate, a great standard bearer for conservatism, and a great president,” Matalin said, and his candidacy’s failure could mean that “we’re going to have to burn down the village.”

Conservatives who chose the fiscal liberal or the gumby-like faux conservative over Fred (most conservatives) because they didn’t like his “lack of energy,” poll numbers, late entry or any other superficial reason are really the last people who should be faulting others for choosing John McCain based on electability instead of principle. The Rubicon of abandoned principle runs through South Carolina, not Super Tuesday. Hopefully next time conservatives will heed their principles before complaining about the party abandoning its principles.

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Super Tuesday Post-Mortem

Posted by Sal on February 6, 2008

Well, Super Tuesday has come and gone, and the results are not good.  The race for the Republican Nomination is essentially over, and John McCain is the inevitable nominee.  First, lets look at last night’s indicators as mentioned in my previous post

 California:  This was the biggest disappointment.  All polls showed momentum in Mitt’s favor, and if he had pulled this off, he would still be in this race.  As it is, he received 10% less of the vote than McCain, and it was distributed widely throughout the state, so McCain won almost all of the CA delegates. 

The South:  Huckabee surged last night, winning 5 southern states.  While it kept delgates from McCain, it also prevented Romney from a conservative foothold in the South.  If Romney had won California, it would have been helpful;  that, however, did not happen, and now Huckabee has the distinction of being the regional candidate from the south. 

Massachusetts:  Romney won by 10, but it was not enough to solidify more than a bare majority of the Massachusetts delegates.  Romney won 22, McCain 17. 

New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Arizona:  McCain won all four of these must-win states for him, plus some unexpected surprises in Missouri, California, Oklahoma, and Delaware. 

Delegate Count:  The dust is still settling, but it looks like McCain could finish last night with around 700 delegates, while Romney would have shy of 300 and Huckabee around 175.  Overall, a huge win for McCain. 

With Romney essentially out (barring some improbably turn of events), the Conservative movement now must come to terms with John McCain as its nominee.  Over the past few days, I’ve gone through bouts of “McCain Derangement Syndrome” and wrestled with the idea of a candidate who had given Conservatives the finger so many times being our nominee for President.  I have to say, I do not like John McCain, I think he is a moderate who tries too hard to please the media and the left, someone who is more interested in sponsoring legislation with Ted Kennedy than with John Kyl.  But the prospect of a She-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named or Obama presidency is even worse than a McCain presidency, and so I will support McCain for President. 

I do feel, however that he cannot win.  Too many conservatives have an inherent distrust and disgust for John McCain, and there may be enough who decide to sit it out rather than have a RINO as President, or even some who would be foolish enough to cast a vote for the Democrat to send a message.  I do worry about McCain further diluting the conservatism of the Republican party, and dread the thought of another 8 years before we get a crack at the Presidency again.  However, with the war on terror, and the prospect of multiple Supreme Court vacancies, it is the best option we have.  This is not an endorsement of McCain, rather it is a resigned acceptance of the inevitable and the lesser of two evils choice. 

McCain now has work to do.  To win, he needs the base that he has disdained for the past 8 years.  He needs to unify and galvanize the base, and the best thing he can do is choose a good, conservative running mate, and make overtures to the base, to Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, Laura Ingraham, and Sean Hannity.  He needs to go to CPAC in with a conciliatory, unifying tone,  and show conservatives convincingly how he will help advance our goals and agenda.  It’s a tough road and may not be possible, but it is a must for him to win the Presidency. 

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Super Tuesday!

Posted by Sal on February 5, 2008

As those of us in twenty-four states go to the polls today, there are many things to watch.  I’m only going to touch on the GOP side, as I have not been following the particulars of the Democrat race (save the constant crying before a major election of She Who Must Not Be Named). 

California:  This is a closed primary state, which is Winner-take-all by District.  Polls are all over the map on this one.  The state is winner-take-all by district, so if Romney does well in the majority of districts, he could significantly expand his deleagte count here.  If he does not do well here, he is finished. 

The South:  This has been Huckabee’s stronghold, but he is now showing a sharp decline.  Recent polls have McCain/Romney up or near tied in many states.  Watch to see if either McCain or Romney make significant inroads in the south now that Huckabee is in decline. 

Massachusetts:  Yes, my home-state of MA is important today.  It is a state Romney is expected to win, but it partitions its delegates proportionally.  The margin of victory by Romney will be important as far as delegate count, so the higher the margin of victory, the better. 

Midwest/West:  There are several states that are holding caucus’ today.  Romney needs to win most or all of them to remain competitive. 

New York/New Jersey/Connecticut/Arizona:  All these are Winner-take-all, and heavily favored for McCain.  If he loses even one, it would be a major upset and probably finish him. 

Delegate Count:  At the end of the day, look for McCain to have around 600 delegates, Romney to have around 400, and Huckabee to have around 150 delegates.  If McCain has significantly more and Romney significantly less than the above, the race is basically over.  If the margin is closer by days end, look for Romney to have momentum.  Either way, today is an extremely critical day in the GOP primary race. 

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Reagan Wisdom for Super Tuesday

Posted by Sal on February 4, 2008

As many of us go to the polls this Tuesday (myself included) to vote for the GOP Presidential Nomination, I want to present two quotes from Ronald Reagan from the 1970s that ring very true today, courtesy of Rush Limbaugh.  

I’m impatient with those Republicans who — after the last election — rushed into print saying we must broaden the base of our party, when what they meant was to fuzz up and blur even more the differences between ourselves and our opponents.  –Ronald Reagan, 1975

And: 

Don’t give up your ideals, don’t compromise, don’t turn to expedience — and don’t, for heaven’s sake, having seen the inner workings of the watch — get cynical. –Ronald Reagan, 1976.

And with that, not much else needs to be said. 

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Romny-Mentum?

Posted by Sal on February 3, 2008

A week ago I was dejected that McCain was going to be the nominee of the Republican Party.  While I do have concerns over Romney, McCain has had the habit over the past 8 years of giving the finger to conservatives.  While Romney may be a gamble, I’d prefer a gamble to someone who has consistently gone out of his way to distance himself from conservatives. 

I still think that McCain is the probable nominee of our party.  But in what may be a glimmer of hope, Rasmussen has released a poll on California which has Romney and McCain tied;  this is after a similar poll several days ago showing McCain with a 4-point lead.  A similar poll by Zogby/CNN/USA-Today poll, which traditionally over-estimates McCain’s support, shows Romney with a 3-point lead in CA.  California probably represents Romney’s last stand.  If he can win there and Massachusetts, pick up some caucus states, he could remain competitive beyond Super Tuesday and possible get enough momentum to upset McCain.  If he loses CA, however, he is most likely finished.  California is a closed primary with a rather conservative Republican electorate, so he does have a shot.

I for one will be casting my vote for Romney on Tuesday, but for now, enough politics and time for the Super Bowl. 

Posted in Election 2008, Politics | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

It’s Not Over

Posted by Sal on January 24, 2008

The media would have you believed that the Republican nomination is all-but over, and John McCain is the nominee.  What this is is more of a case of the media hoping that their protege Republican will get the nod based on his perceived strength against the Democrats and his inevitability, much in the same way that they hailed Bob Dole as the most electable Republican in 1996.  With victories in New Hampshire and South Carolina, two states that have open primaries, McCain is now perceived to be the front-runner, if not inevitable.  The truth is, he has won fewer states than Mitt Romney, has fewer delegates, and has less of a vote total.  So how is he the front-runner again? 

Now enter Florida.  Florida has the distinction of being the final primary before super-duper Tuesday.  It also happens to be a closed primary, and McCain has not done well among non-Conservatives, capturing most of his support in the Republican Primary from Democrats and Independents.  Florida also has a fairly large 57 delegates at stake in a winner-take-all Primary battle.  Two new polls now look like the momentum in Florida has shifted to Romney. 

Both Rasmussen and Mason-Dixon have Romney up by 4 points in Florida.  Both of these polls were taken after the drop-out of Fred Thompson from the race, so it appears that Romney is benefiting from end of Thompson’s campaign.  (Only these two polls, as well as InsiderAdvantage, which has McCain up by 1 point, have been taken since Tuesday when Thompson left the race).  Mason-Dixon is by far the most accurate polling firm at the state level, followed by Rasmussen.  Although much could happen between now and Tuesday (including tonight’s debate), the momentum is clearly in Mitt’s favor. 

If Mitt does indeed claim victory in Florida, will he then be hailed by the Drive-by media as the “clear front-runner” going into Super Tuesday?  I doubt it, but it will be clear that the race for the Republican nominee is far from over. 

Posted in Election 2008, Media Bias, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »